# Open Source

Writing Golang Tests for an Alcoholic REST API

Continuing on with last week's Athenaeum post, I mentioned that I wanted to explore easily overlooked processes or topics that junior developers don't always have the chance to dive into. The original intent being to allow the project to grow in such a way that it would demonstrate through it's iterative history a step-by-step example of taking a small project all the way to the big world of Public Clouds, Containers, and other infrastructure goodies. Along with that, I also wanted to explore software development patterns and testing practices. In this article, I want to explain what's been done so far: writing back-end unit tests and exploring the world of `code coverage`!

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Why You Need A Dog's Opinion For Code Review

Or at least, that's what we all think at the start of the project. Every code-base has their respective hacks, workarounds, and inconsistencies when not kept in check. I imagine that consistent code quality in each pull request is the goal, but we all know how easy it is for items to slip past our reviews. That's why I wanted to explore adding Code Analysis tooling from the very start to the project for both the front-end and back-end. Enter the first tool, Hound!

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Following The Tomato Timer

I've always had terrible luck focusing when not in the office, I believe the cause rooting from the environment itself implying that "work gets done" here vs at home. With that being said, it's easy to imagine the past eight weeks that I've been "attempting" to work from home have been quite difficult. After acknowledging that we may be in this for the long haul, I knew that I'd have to find a better coping / focus strategy; one more rigid-yet-balanced, one which screams "productivity" and forces such. Essentially, I wanted a focus system which prioritized focused work in a single domain vs micro managing various domains between my work and personal tasks. It dawned on me that every phone I've ever used always had the same set of applications installed, including one which I used to leverage often in High School: a Pomodoro App.

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Being Apart of the Telescope Open Source Project

David Humphrey's (and Seneca's) open source project, titled Telescope (for those who've been living under a rock) has reached the end of semester milestone goal of 1.0! Along with that, the 1000th issue and pull request was created, marking the classes internal milestone from what I understand. Watching this from an external perspective is quite the thrill. I remember telling Dave recently just how life changing telescope could be for some of the graduates; it truly is a project that unearths and shapes interests, teaches real software development and the combined rush / peril one can feel at any given second, version control when working in a team, and being proud of your work. In my opinion, I believe every single individual who frequents that Slack channel will see the dedication and pride that each contributor exerts into telescope.

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End-to-End Telescope with Docker, WSL2 and Windows 10

So on April 3rd, I managed to completely blow up my Pop!OS installation beyond repair. I blame Nvidia drivers and permissions, but it's also a reminder to `never fix what's not broken`. For the past month, I had really enjoyed being on Linux and tweaking about with various aspects of my desktop, yet even in that happiness my friends constantly reminded me of the applications that I used which don't support Linux. This included games, audio software, guitar effects for example. I decided hey, if my install is already borked and backed-up, let's install Windows 10 for the weekend and see how frustrated I can get. Solid plan, don't you think?

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Why I Got Into Programming

Despite my constant drift to different technologies, operating systems and languages (which, to be fair is rather natural with the given task, ever-changing preferences, etc), I've found the motivation and drive behind has never changed. So I decided to write about it. Let's get the obvious (in my mind at least) out of the way first.

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Adding Stats To Telescope's Banner Component in React

Initially, I leveraged the Login and Search components mentioned above as examples of how to both write JSX and also how to modify state. Coming from VueJS -where state's modified via `Vuex` (Redux), or via local components without a state or store, React's state management both made more sense out of the box (and this could be attributed to Cindys and A Garcia maintenance and development of the front-end) and more convoluted in comparison. It had the intimidation and challenging factor that I was looking forward to tackling and equally yearning to avoid for as long as possible.

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Determing Average Storage Costs via Azure with Python

About a month ago, a photographer (and filmmaker in the making) friend approached me about hosting in Azure a copy of his media for safekeeping, and wanted to also understand an average cost over time as they'd add more files to the Storage Account. Funnily enough, this is a small application script that I had written before for the green office, along with a script that I had integrated into one of my monthly to-be-automated tasks here in the red office. I figured I's share the Simple Python script, seeing that despite some of the excellent documentation provided by Microsoft, there are multiple ways to approach the solution which can easily be mangled and confused with other solutions and recommendations.

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Experiment: Moving to Pop!OS For A Month

As of this past weekend, which marked the start of March and what appears to be kinder climates, I opted to conclude the one year experiment and evaluate the state of the Linux desktop in comparison for a month. Though Windows itself wasn't giving much grief, there were still workflows and quirks that I truly never got over; likewise developing with WSL 2.0 proved to be quite the abstract objective than I thought which led to quite a bit of productivity-loss. I still quite enjoy the concept of Windows Subsystem for Linux, and feel that if I had started using it from day one instead of dropping it into a pre-existing `GIT-BASH` setup that things would be quite smoother. Curiously, I have plans to test exactly that If I end up returning to Windows 10 in the near future. Regardless, I have to work with CentOS, Red Hat and Fedora systems daily at work -which, encourages me to run a similar system for both my home an development environments. Such familiarity truly can help produce fantastic results when enveloped in a unified mindset among different.

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Reduced Container Sizes With Multi-Stage Docker Builds

I had worked on Docker in the past for one of my internships, optimizing our microservice build pipeline to utilize multi-stage containers (at the sake of time complexity) which enabled far smaller artifacts to be stored in the private repository which had the compiled resources and bare minimum node-modules that were needed. For that microservice architecture, we successfully decreased the size from ~1GB (x 7 for the services) to ~140mb (x 7). That's just under 1GB for the entire architecture compared 7GB previously!

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What I Use in 2020 For Software Development

I figured I'd open up this article with explaining a few of the domains that I work in, both professionally and as a hobby. My hopes is that it provides a better context into some of the choices of technologies. For work, my current title is Cloud Engineer, and on the side, I find myself doing hobby programming in the web, mobile and open source domains.

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Leveraging Functional Programming for Data Parsing

For much of January, a key deliverable of the team was to parse and send data between critical systems; a simple enough task really when worded like that. The complexity arose from the included business requirements and edge cases which drove the sprint estimate points from a capable `3` to a concerning `8`, knowing that only a single developer would be focused on this for 100% of their sprint until a POC to be demonstrated came from their efforts. Only then, could the team help carry the torch and make decisions based on the challenges encountered.

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Migrating a WordPress Site to JAMStack

I've been working with Gridsome and VueJS for a few hobby projects throughout 2019, and was quite impressed with what JAMstacks offered. It intrigued the systematic side of me; the one which is always looking for efficiency, for the next big thing which bridges upcoming and established platforms and produces a user experience like no other. Having always resented the (truthfully, well developed) WordPress editors (both new and classic), the concept of writing blog posts in Markdown and having them compiled to a static website seemed incredibly modern. Imagine blogging without ever having to leave your editor (assuming you're confident in your spelling of course for this example!), and a commit taking that little markdown file to your published blog in such a way that you can't help but say grin in aw.

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Starting Ruby Software Development With Unit Tests

Since joining my current employer, I've found myself working with Ruby programs more often so than other scripting languages. I can't really say just yet whether or not I enjoy working in the language, but it's syntax is no beauty such as Python. Instead, once getting past syntax which is comparable to a blended mix of multiple 2000s languages, it's built-in idioms draw you into a new level of thinking and designing. With all the recent exposure, including inheriting a legacy Ruby project and it's surrounding components, I decided for 2020 that I wanted to learn proper software testing and enterprise designs.

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Extending Traversey Media’s VueJS Crash Course

After completing the two hour VueJS crash course, I felt the wanting to extend the functionality to include an edit, and details view. Furthermore, I wanted to integrate a new CSS framework as well to give the project a coherent and modern look -gasp, without using my framework of choice: Bulma? Well I want to learn something new, evaluate a skeleton (minimalist) framework. For this little addition, I was considering using a heavyweight framework such as Formantic UI (a community fork of Semantic UI), but instead landed on the minimalist framework Milligram. For this article, due to work also keeping me incredibly busy on top of other obligations, I opted to split up the two (styling vs functionality) with this article targeting the former. Without further ado, let’s talk about enhancing the experience.

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My First Impressions of Udacity's Kotlin for Android Development

For 2019, one of my goals was to complete the Google/Udacity Kotlin for Android Development course. Since starting on the first, I’ve completed the first three `lessons` of ten in the course (sadly, it appears that they are still working on content for lessons five to ten, and have not published the work for them), so I thought I’d give my initial feedback and also thoughts on the course’s primary focus: developing Android applications using Kotlin.  Digging into the unfinished courses does provide the video files, so it’s possible to learn some of Lesson’s 5-10 on my own without the quizzes or sample code.

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Using Docker to Orchestrate and Manage Node Projects

I found myself frustrated with this constant battle, be-it on ANY system that I was using. Eventually, they all became too cluttered and unlike a USB key which you could pull away and forget about, it was hard to clear out the jank without exposing your rm -rf habits to critical file systems. This is where I came up with the convoluted but totally awesome idea: Can I run NodeJS projects through Docker, and discard the container when I am done?

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Closing Two Weeks Completed of the 100 Days of Code Challenge

Wow, how quickly two weeks are passing by while you're busy enjoying every hour you can with code, technology, people, and for once, the weather. I'm even more surprised to see that I was able to maintain a small git commit streak (10 days, which was cut yesterday, more on that below) which is damn incredible considering that I spent 90% of my time outside of work away from a keyboard. I told myself that I would try my hardest to still learn and implement what I could while travelling, opting to go deep into the documentation (which I will include from what I can put from the various Git commits and search history below) and learning what it means to write `Pythonic` code.

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An Introduction to The 100 Days of Code

The day has finally come, the start of the much discussed 100 days of code! The official website can be found here: 100daysofcode.com, which explains the methodologies and why(s) of the challenge. I decided that it would be the best way to start learning new languages and concepts that I've always wanted to have experience in, such as `Python`, `Swift`, `Rust`, and `GoLang`. The first and primary scope is to learn Python, and have a comfort with the language similar to how I do with C and C++.

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Removing the Excess Years from Angular Material's DatePicker

So here we are, potentially the last contribution to occur for OSD700 from this developer before the semester ends and marks are finalized. No pressure.

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The Cost of Aesthetic in Flat Design

For the final release, one of the issues I wanted to focus on was [this](https://github.com/angular/material2/issues/10727), which I figured would be an easy contribution toward the project and a check off of my final release requirements. After reviewing the comments on the issue, I was under the impression that I had to learn a new accessibly standard titled aXe. aXe was going to be the driving force behind this post, but to my fortune it's more of a testing engine than a standard; testing instead web applications and pages against the WCAG 2.0 AA rulesets.

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A Second Semester of Open Source Contributions Completed

It's hard to believe how quickly this semester has come to a close. Some of us including me even had countdown calendars, and yet the days escaped even quicker than we could count. It feels like just last week I started my second dedicated foray into Open Source technologies, and yet in the next two weeks it'll be the end of such adventure (for now, that is). Similar to what I did when I completed OSD600, I thought I'd recap and share my thoughts as I complete OSD700, and perhaps also allude to the progression and experiences between the two which is only possible through fantastic instructors such as David.

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The Importance of Properly Setting Up Your Linter

This week, having thought I had climbed and conquered the smallest imaginable version of Everest, I climbed into my favorite chair, put on headphones, and let hours pass by while finishing `Haunted Empire`. My phone went off during this time, but unless it was a call or message, I thought nothing of it. I finished the book, pleased with the epilogue and wondering if had it been updated with the current exploits and affairs of Apple, would the ending remarks differ.

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Autocomplete for All, An Angular Material Story

this day and age, you live in one of two camps, you either love or hate autocomplete. Autocomplete (which differs from autocorrect due to contextual opposites of operation) is the answer to the mundane long dropdown lists, providing a means to both filter and evaluate a value without scrolling through the entire component _(and then some!)_.

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The Importance of Documented API for UI Components

Documentation is a topic that often splits developers into two or more camps, those who write and those who don't; an irony since both camps rely heavily on documentation with external libraries to utilize and understand it's respective API. So, when is documentation considered 'good'?

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Accessibility - Headings and Colour Examples

As you would have guessed, even I found the issues discussed above in past work from two websites which I used to claim where the best I was capable of at that time. Even more so, now that I know of these issues (which I discovered while looking for examples), the urge to fix and improve upon is there. In the South Wind Motel Website, I improperly used a H1 for the hero component, which would be fine had I made that hero display 'Accommodations' instead of a tagline. Let's explore!

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Understanding U11YN Concerns Relating to Modern Flat Design and Screen Readers

Accessibility is one topic which not many take into account when designing and developing an application, website, or printed media even. The concept of visual and interactive accessibility relates to any medium which the user uses to discover and consume content from, and how different impairments hinder the common forms and designs useless and nonconsumable.

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The Trials of The Promise-Centric Input, a Visual Studio Code Story - 2

In a previous post, I went through a retelling of anguish, environmental issues and dead ends while trying to evaluate how a bug such as this was possible. Throughout the process, I kept asking myself and even the other developers, what is the scope? Where could this bug be created?

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The Trials of The Promise-Centric Input, a Visual Studio Code Story

It was made clear to me that the bug was a regression, and not evident two months or so ago. I knew that the current master branch contained the issue. According to the comment thread, this issue had arrived around a month or two ago.

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Initial Reactions to working with Programmatically Generated UIs in Visual Studio Code

When I first started contributing what I could to Visual Studio Code, I was under the impression that it was written using React. Even while working with the custom drop down component, I was still under the impression there were React Front-end technologies which enabled for the dynamic rendering of various components and functionalities. Only in recent, while debugging and looking for high-level understanding of different scopes, did I realize that Visual Studio Code developed without the front-end JavaScript frameworks such as Angular, Vue, React or even MeteorJS. Without sounding like I just discovered Pluto being once called a planet, this was very left field.

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How I Approach Bug Fixes in a new Code Base

The one thing that Humphrey said which really resonates with me on the topic of bug fixing is summed up as this, '(on bugs) they're easier to understand since the code foundations have already been laid out before you, all you have to do is understand it'. Even at work, I found myself for the past 4 weeks focused on bug fixes to our product prior to the Mobile World Congress (MWC) event, so I was both sick and very well experienced in trial-error approaches towards bug fixing. Here are three concepts / thoughts which I find often result in a step in the right direction when it comes to solving the infamous issue, resolving the ticket, or adding the feature which exists in a different scope.

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Approaching Accessibility with Visual Studio Code

For the last three years, I've grown a passion for extending technologies towards a direction which makes them more accessible for a wider range of users. It took a while to realize what accessibility truly meant in the world of development, software, websites and health organizations. Through the process, I took a course on behalf of my employer at the time to learn the three levels which make up the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, A, AA, and AAA. This course took me through so many spirals of knowledge and issue, all-encompassing different scenarios and acceptance criteria for web development. After taking the course, I started to see software design and accessibility very differently. Contrast between colors, element organization, font-sizing even became subject of my mental focus at first.

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Becoming a Maintainer of BulmaPress

I love Bulma, I love contributing to projects instead of spinning up my shoddy implementation of a need, and I love when the two come together in such harmony it's as if fate meant it. I discovered BulmaPress while looking for Bulma / Non-Bootstrap WordPress themes for a CMS project I'm working on. It looked to be relatively abandoned, sporting an old version of Bulma 0.2.1 and last being updated half a year ago.

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Exploring The Inner Workings of Visual Studio Code’s Command Panel

Interesting concept, it’s a very surreal experience to explore and work on a project while using said project as the tool for development and exploration.

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Building Visual Studio Code

Building Visual Studio Code is quite the interesting process, mostly because the dependencies differ in obtainability between operating systems. For this article, I’m going through the process on MacOS High Sierra since it will be primary development machine for upcoming bug fixes, code improvements and contributions to Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code.

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Contributing to the Bulma CSS Framework

I've been a major fan of Bulma ever since discovering it through the weekend project of developer Hassan Djirdeh (@djirdehh), https://www.cryptovue.com. On top of introducing me to the Bulma CSS framework which I instantly fell in love with, it also introduced me to VueJS, a JavaScript framework which, like Bulma, is capturing the attention of developers quicker and quicker each day. It's been at least five months since I had first discovered Bulma, and in that time it's already become my favorite CSS Framework and goto tool for Front-end Web Development. It's replaced Bootstrap, Foundation, and Semantic UI within the span of months; a task which I wouldn't consider easy by any means.

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Visual Studio Code Plugins I Use for Modern Web Development

Visual Studio Code has quickly become my go-to text editor for many languages, even replacing XCode for Swift-centric programs or IntelliJ for light-weight Java programming. This article focuses more on the web development plugins which have provided a smoother experience for the past eight months of my internship at SOTI while learning the ways of the full-stack developer. If you have suggestions or alternatives to the listed plugins, I'd love to hear about it in the comments!

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The Open Source Audio Project (Idea!)

Hello there! If you're not new to blog, or I haven't changed any of the main headings for the website at the time of this article, you'd be aware just how big of an advocate I am of FOSS technologies on our everyday mediums. Android devices running AOSP-centric ROMs, Linux workstations running Fedora 26, and my non-FOSS hardware running as many OSS technologies as possible such as Inkshot, Visual Studio Code, Kdenlive, Firefox, etc. Ironically, the one theme which I hadn't played with for a few years now was audio production in an open source environment.

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A Semester Working Exclusively with MEAN Stacks

Since May, I've had the unique experience of working with MEAN stacks on a daily basis, each varying in complexity and architecture to reflect a different end goal. A semester ago, I'd never guessed how little time I'd be spending writing C++, Java, Swift, or even Python applications compared to JavaScript-powered web applications. Furthermore, this is the first time in my life that I'd been exposed to a technology stack not taught at Seneca, which during the time of my attendance examined LAMP, and C# / ASP.NET stacks.

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Taking Boostnote for a Spin

Recently, I came across a review conducted by It’s FOSS which described a new open source project aimed at improving the experience of note taking for developers. Titled Boostnote, here’s what I gathered after making the software my default note taking application and snippet manager -replacing SimpleNote in the process.

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Reviewing a Peer's Optimization

This post will be one of my last related to this semester, specifically to OSD600 which has seen the class learning quite a bit about Open Source web technologies; contributing to Mozilla’s Thimble in doing so.

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Introducing Thimble’s Console V1.0

This post will be one of my last related to this semester, specifically to OSD600 which has seen the class learning quite a bit about Open Source web technologies; contributing to Mozilla’s Thimble in doing so.

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To Fail, is to Learn Without Safety Nets 2

The reason for such debauchery of our beloved cryptographic function? Because in attempts to optimize; I did the polar opposite. Coming to terms with such a fact is a difficult endeavour; analysing why it couldn’t be any more optimized being the only solution at the present time. So, I’ll continue from where I left off on!

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A Conclusion to My First Semester Dedicated to Open Source Technologies

This semester, I dragged mind, body and code through five courses which strengthened, degraded, and tested the absolute limits of how little sleep one can get. Of the courses, two had a central focus on understanding, contributing and leveraging Open Source technologies on a multitude of platforms.

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To Fail, is to Learn Without Safety Nets

This series of posts includes not just my admittance to failure, unable to optimize a previously selected function, but also how I learned from said failure in regards to style, logic, and also why the algorithm was already at peak performance.

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An Introduction to Heroku

This week, the class was introduced to Heroku, which is described as, “a platform as a service (PaaS) that enables developers to build, run, and operate applications entirely in the cloud”.

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Giving Life to the Console in Thimble

This short article will elaborate recent developments to the Thimble developer console that I’ve been implementing, with the previous progress post located.

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Why Mobile Devices Are Built Using AArch64 Chipsets

A common theme in the SPO600 course, is the need for software which originally was written for x86_64 to be ported over to AArch64 chipsets. This includes providing better capability,  optimizations, and developer support for the alternative processing architecture. Doing so is not as easy as one might imagine, for the GCC compiler (in the case of C code) already covers quite a bit of optimizations during compilation on a AArch64 system.

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Unit Testing a NodeJS Driven Project

This lab extends the previous OSD600 Lab, which had us creating a NodeJS project with which utilized ESLint, choosing a JavaScript coding guideline, and finally testing our efforts with the powerful Travis CI. This time, we were introduced to the process of unit testing; another important developer tool which is often overlooked in smaller projects. Unit testing involves the process of programmatically asserting the expected results of your functions, providing both valid or invalid arguments or any item which may considered edge cases. For those searching for a better definition, I’d recommend looking into [Wikipedia’s definition](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_testing). One thing that Wikipedia doesn’t have, is the process of which this lab had us going through, which I’ve included below. Let’s jump in!

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When Segfaulting Won’t Do

Sometimes, you have a great idea which may improve one of the worst processes a developer routinely experiences over and over, and sometimes your idea is so grand that reality escapes your grasp quicker and quicker with each passing second. This is what I had come to realize after discussing with Chris how I could benchmark my updated segfault function, to which his response was simply, “why?”

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Bramble Console = self.Console()

This small post is an update to the [Thimble Console implementation](http://raygervais.ca/javascript-console-in-thimble/) that I’ve been working on with the help of [David Humphrey](https://github.com/humphd).

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Creating a NodeJS Driven Project

For this week, we were introduced to a few technologies that though interacted with during our contributions and coding, were never described or explained the ‘why’, ‘how’, or even the ‘where to start’ aspects. The platforms on trial? Node, Travis CL and even ESLint -curse you linter, for making my code uniform.

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Optimizing Glibc’s SegFault

Segmentation Fault (Core Dumped) is a phrase that many know all too well, so much so that some developers such as yours truly was even granted the pleasurable nickname of ‘segfault’ during their first year at Seneca College. So, when tasked with the intention of optimizing a function or few from the GNU C Library (GLibc for short), I thought I may as well play a hand in ruining other programmer’s days as well. Seeing that segfault() existed in this library lit up my eyes to mischievous intents and melancholy memories, but I knew I wanted to take a crack at improving it.

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Writing Inline Assembly in C

For this exercise, the task was described in the following way, “Write a version of the Volume Scaling solution from the Algorithm Selection Lab for AArch64 that uses the SQDMULH or SQRDMULH instructions via inline assembler”.

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Writing Good Contribution Messages

On Tuesday, the class was told a key fact that I imagine not a single in the room had ever thought before; commit messages, pull requests, and even issue descriptions, are the sole most challenging item for any developer to get right. This was in the context of working in an open source community. I was curious, so I looked into my pull request titles, commit messages and pull request descriptions.

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Compiler Vectorization in Assembly

For this exercise, we were tasked with the following instructions, cautioned that only ones with patience would achieve completion of this lab with their sanity intact.

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JavaScript Console in Thimble

Originally, my aspirations had drawn my contribution choice to a recently suggested UI enhancement, which can be found in my previous [blog post here](http://raygervais.ca/brackets-enhancement-proposal/). Though it led to some valuable discussions for said implementation, it was decided that until such topic is further conceptualized, my contributions should be spent otherwise in a more concrete topic.

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Going Evil

I have been a vim user for about two years, most of that time dedicated to simply learning how to exit the application. But all jokes aside, I’ve been using this editor for 90% of my projects and can say with confidence that despite its perverse editing modes, my continuous failures to execute the correct command -by hitting the key right beside the desired target mind you, I am proficient enough to navigate a document and develop. This week, I decided I wanted to see what it was like on the other side of the editor war. This week, I went evil.

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Brackets Enhancement Proposal

When we were given the instructions to search, locate and eventually implement fixes or upgrades to Mozilla’s Thimble or Brackets, I found what perhaps was the most challenging enhancement I could possible implement.

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Algorithm Selection in C

During this lab, we were instructed to program two different implementations which attempted the same process; adjusting the volume of a sequence of samples. This program would be implemented in C, and benchmarked using the conventional time.h library available through the system.

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Contributing a Bug Fix to Thimble

In the last week of January I posted about setting up a local instance of Thimble, an online editor which supported the learning of HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

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Creating Static Web Content hosted by Github

When we were given the instructions to search, locate and eventually implement fixes or upgrades to Mozilla’s Thimble or Brackets, I found what perhaps was the most challenging enhancement I could possible implement.

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Compiler Optimizations and Features

When we were given the instructions to search, locate and eventually implement fixes or upgrades to Mozilla’s Thimble or Brackets, I found what perhaps was the most challenging enhancement I could possible implement.

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Contributing to Mozilla's Thimble

An OSD600 contributions to Thimble, a web learning tool/editor based off of Adobe's Brackets.

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Open Source Contributions

In this class, we learn and work about the complex field of Open Source development, including the vast ways it can be found in our everyday devices.

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The Differences between Git & SVN

With the start of the new year, and a semester which contains a promising set of courses that many are excited for, it's appropriate that open source technologies have become the leading topic of this semester.

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Linux Package Build Process

Today we learned how to build GNUChess from source

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Django Python Framework & OptiKey Keyboard Project Analysis

A quick look into the Django and OptiKey project Licenses.

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Kickstarter Open Sourced Android and iOS Applications

Kickstarter open-sources their Android and iOS Application!

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Source Code to 2017

With the start of the new year, and a semester which contains a promising set of courses that many are excited for, it's appropriate that open source technologies have become the leading topic of this semester.

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