# OSD600

Being Apart of the Telescope Open Source Project

David Humphrey's (and Seneca's) open source project, titled Telescope (for those who've been living under a rock) has reached the end of semester milestone goal of 1.0! Along with that, the 1000th issue and pull request was created, marking the classes internal milestone from what I understand. Watching this from an external perspective is quite the thrill. I remember telling Dave recently just how life changing telescope could be for some of the graduates; it truly is a project that unearths and shapes interests, teaches real software development and the combined rush / peril one can feel at any given second, version control when working in a team, and being proud of your work. In my opinion, I believe every single individual who frequents that Slack channel will see the dedication and pride that each contributor exerts into telescope.

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Adding Stats To Telescope's Banner Component in React

Initially, I leveraged the Login and Search components mentioned above as examples of how to both write JSX and also how to modify state. Coming from VueJS -where state's modified via `Vuex` (Redux), or via local components without a state or store, React's state management both made more sense out of the box (and this could be attributed to Cindys and A Garcia maintenance and development of the front-end) and more convoluted in comparison. It had the intimidation and challenging factor that I was looking forward to tackling and equally yearning to avoid for as long as possible.

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Reduced Container Sizes With Multi-Stage Docker Builds

I had worked on Docker in the past for one of my internships, optimizing our microservice build pipeline to utilize multi-stage containers (at the sake of time complexity) which enabled far smaller artifacts to be stored in the private repository which had the compiled resources and bare minimum node-modules that were needed. For that microservice architecture, we successfully decreased the size from ~1GB (x 7 for the services) to ~140mb (x 7). That's just under 1GB for the entire architecture compared 7GB previously!

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Introducing Thimble’s Console V1.0

This post will be one of my last related to this semester, specifically to OSD600 which has seen the class learning quite a bit about Open Source web technologies; contributing to Mozilla’s Thimble in doing so.

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A Conclusion to My First Semester Dedicated to Open Source Technologies

This semester, I dragged mind, body and code through five courses which strengthened, degraded, and tested the absolute limits of how little sleep one can get. Of the courses, two had a central focus on understanding, contributing and leveraging Open Source technologies on a multitude of platforms.

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An Introduction to Heroku

This week, the class was introduced to Heroku, which is described as, “a platform as a service (PaaS) that enables developers to build, run, and operate applications entirely in the cloud”.

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Giving Life to the Console in Thimble

This short article will elaborate recent developments to the Thimble developer console that I’ve been implementing, with the previous progress post located.

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Unit Testing a NodeJS Driven Project

This lab extends the previous OSD600 Lab, which had us creating a NodeJS project with which utilized ESLint, choosing a JavaScript coding guideline, and finally testing our efforts with the powerful Travis CI. This time, we were introduced to the process of unit testing; another important developer tool which is often overlooked in smaller projects. Unit testing involves the process of programmatically asserting the expected results of your functions, providing both valid or invalid arguments or any item which may considered edge cases. For those searching for a better definition, I’d recommend looking into [Wikipedia’s definition](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_testing). One thing that Wikipedia doesn’t have, is the process of which this lab had us going through, which I’ve included below. Let’s jump in!

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Creating a NodeJS Driven Project

For this week, we were introduced to a few technologies that though interacted with during our contributions and coding, were never described or explained the ‘why’, ‘how’, or even the ‘where to start’ aspects. The platforms on trial? Node, Travis CL and even ESLint -curse you linter, for making my code uniform.

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Bramble Console = self.Console()

This small post is an update to the [Thimble Console implementation](http://raygervais.ca/javascript-console-in-thimble/) that I’ve been working on with the help of [David Humphrey](https://github.com/humphd).

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Writing Good Contribution Messages

On Tuesday, the class was told a key fact that I imagine not a single in the room had ever thought before; commit messages, pull requests, and even issue descriptions, are the sole most challenging item for any developer to get right. This was in the context of working in an open source community. I was curious, so I looked into my pull request titles, commit messages and pull request descriptions.

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JavaScript Console in Thimble

Originally, my aspirations had drawn my contribution choice to a recently suggested UI enhancement, which can be found in my previous [blog post here](http://raygervais.ca/brackets-enhancement-proposal/). Though it led to some valuable discussions for said implementation, it was decided that until such topic is further conceptualized, my contributions should be spent otherwise in a more concrete topic.

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Going Evil

I have been a vim user for about two years, most of that time dedicated to simply learning how to exit the application. But all jokes aside, I’ve been using this editor for 90% of my projects and can say with confidence that despite its perverse editing modes, my continuous failures to execute the correct command -by hitting the key right beside the desired target mind you, I am proficient enough to navigate a document and develop. This week, I decided I wanted to see what it was like on the other side of the editor war. This week, I went evil.

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Brackets Enhancement Proposal

When we were given the instructions to search, locate and eventually implement fixes or upgrades to Mozilla’s Thimble or Brackets, I found what perhaps was the most challenging enhancement I could possible implement.

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Contributing a Bug Fix to Thimble

In the last week of January I posted about setting up a local instance of Thimble, an online editor which supported the learning of HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

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Creating Static Web Content hosted by Github

When we were given the instructions to search, locate and eventually implement fixes or upgrades to Mozilla’s Thimble or Brackets, I found what perhaps was the most challenging enhancement I could possible implement.

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Contributing to Mozilla's Thimble

An OSD600 contributions to Thimble, a web learning tool/editor based off of Adobe's Brackets.

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Open Source Contributions

In this class, we learn and work about the complex field of Open Source development, including the vast ways it can be found in our everyday devices.

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The Differences between Git & SVN

With the start of the new year, and a semester which contains a promising set of courses that many are excited for, it's appropriate that open source technologies have become the leading topic of this semester.

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Kickstarter Open Sourced Android and iOS Applications

Kickstarter open-sources their Android and iOS Application!

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Source Code to 2017

With the start of the new year, and a semester which contains a promising set of courses that many are excited for, it's appropriate that open source technologies have become the leading topic of this semester.

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